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Real Estate & Closing Services. Property Ownership in Mexico.

Real estate is an essential industry in Mexico, attracting foreign investors and contributing significantly to the country's economy.


However, investing in real estate in Mexico involves navigating a complex legal landscape.


In this blog post, we'll explore the legal aspects of real estate in Mexico, including property ownership, taxes, and the process of buying and selling real estate.

Real Estate Mexico | Closing Services | De Hoyos Aviles

Property Ownership in Mexico


In Mexico, property ownership is divided into two categories: ejido and private property.


Ejido land is communal property, typically owned by indigenous communities, while private property is land that can be bought and sold. It's important to understand the difference between these two types of property ownership, as the legal requirements for buying and selling each type can differ significantly.


Foreigners are generally prohibited from owning property within 50 kilometers of the coast or 100 kilometers of the country's borders.

However, there are ways to invest in these areas through a Mexican corporation or a trust called a fideicomiso.



Taxes


As with any real estate investment, taxes are an essential consideration when buying property in Mexico. In Mexico, property taxes are known as predial, and they are calculated based on the assessed value of the property. In addition to property taxes, buyers and sellers must also pay a transfer tax (Impuesto sobre la Transmisión de Bienes Inmuebles or ISAI), which is typically between 2% and 5% of the property's assessed value.


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The Process of Buying and Selling Real Estate in Mexico


The process of buying and selling real estate in Mexico is similar to that in other countries, but there are some unique legal requirements that must be met.


For example, the contract must be in Spanish, and both parties must sign the contract in the presence of a notary public.


Additionally, buyers and sellers must obtain a certificate of no liens (Certificado de Libertad de Gravamen) from the Public Registry of Property.


This certificate confirms that there are no liens or encumbrances on the property that could prevent the sale from proceeding.


However, there are some unique legal requirements that must be met. Here's a brief overview of the process:


  • Offer and Acceptance: The buyer makes an offer to purchase the property, which the seller can either accept or reject.


  • Due Diligence: Once the offer is accepted, the buyer typically has a certain period to conduct due diligence, such as reviewing property records and obtaining a property survey.


  • Contract Signing: Once due diligence is complete, both parties sign a contract that outlines the terms of the sale, including the purchase price, payment schedule, and closing date.


  • Closing: At closing, the buyer pays the purchase price and any applicable taxes and fees. The seller transfers ownership of the property to the buyer, and the transaction is complete.

REAL ESTATE & CLOSING SERVICES | DE HOYOS AVILES

Property Ownership in Mexico: Ejido vs. Private Property


As mentioned earlier, property ownership in Mexico is divided into two categories: ejido and private property.


Ejido land is communal property, typically owned by indigenous communities. It's important to note that ejido land cannot be bought or sold, and any use of this land must be negotiated with the local ejido community.


Additionally, ejido land is subject to restrictions, such as limits on the amount of land that can be used for agricultural purposes.


On the other hand, private property can be bought and sold, but there are some restrictions on foreign ownership.


Foreigners are generally prohibited from owning property within 50 kilometers of the coast or 100 kilometers of the country's borders. However, there are ways to invest in these areas through a Mexican corporation or a trust called a fideicomiso.


A fideicomiso is a trust that is created when a foreigner wants to purchase property in the restricted zones.


The trust is managed by a Mexican bank, and the foreigner is the beneficiary of the trust. The bank holds legal title to the property, but the beneficiary has all the rights of ownership, including the right to use, sell, or mortgage the property.


The trust has a term of 50 years and can be renewed for an additional 50 years.

Taxes

In addition to property taxes and the transfer tax, there are other taxes that buyers and sellers must be aware of when buying or selling real estate in Mexico.


For example, if the seller is a foreigner, they may be subject to capital gains tax on the sale of their property. The capital gains tax rate is generally between 25% and 35%, depending on the seller's tax status.


Buyers and sellers must also be aware of the value-added tax (VAT), which is a tax on goods and services. The VAT rate in Mexico is 16%, and it applies to the sale of new properties by developers or contractors.


DE HOYOS AVILES | AWARDED LAW FIRM

Process of Buying and Selling Real Estate in Mexico


Investing in real estate in Mexico can be a lucrative opportunity, but it's important to understand the legal aspects involved.

Property ownership, taxes, and the process of buying and selling real estate are all essential considerations.

By working with a knowledgeable real estate attorney and conducting thorough due diligence, investors can navigate the legal landscape of real estate in Mexico successfully.

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